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We ran a story last month by Amy Sterling Casil about Scott Dworkin, a #Resistance leader who has hopped aboard a first class seat on the Anti-Trump Gravy Train while apparently doing very little to effectively fight Donald Trump. The story showed that Dowrkin, a Twitter personality and MSNBC regular, had raised plenty of cash for the Democratic Coalition against Trump, a Super PAC he co-founded, but much of that money went to consulting firms owned by him and a few buddies.

Dowrkin has claimed to be a leader in the effort to impeach Trump by showing what he says is “collaboration” between him and Vladimir Putin’s government. But a billboard slamming California member of Congress Devin Nunes is the only major expenditure directly related to “opposing Trump” on his Super PAC’s mid-year 2017 financial disclosure report. That cost less than $2,000, one percent of his group’s revenue.  At least 80 percent went to consulting firms owned by Dworkin and four political colleagues.

Now the Daily Beast has a story — “WELCOME TO THE RE$I$TANCE!; Cash for Coalition Against Trump Going Into Consultants’ Pockets Instead” — which reveals additional details about Dworkin’s group. Here’s an excerpt:

The Democratic Coalition, one of the many new progressive-minded organizations to bloom in the age of anti-Trump fervor, brought in nearly half a million dollars last year. Its donors include…a pair of Hollywood television producers, a former Real Housewife of Miami, and a member of the U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors. The vast majority of its funds, however, have come from people whose names don’t make it into Federal Election Commission disclosures: the small, “unitemized” donors who give $200 or less.

It’s what the group has done with its money—not how much it has brought in—that has raised eyebrows among other operatives.

The Democratic Coalition paid more than half of the money it raised last year to its employees or their consulting firms, according to Federal Election Commission records. Dworkin’s Bulldog Finance Group was the chief beneficiary, drawing more than $130,000 from The Democratic Coalition.

Read the whole story here.

 

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